Neutron Stars

When a star is more massive then 2 solar masses, when it starts to collapse the electrons degeneracy pressure will not be enough. The electrons will move more and more furiously until the power produced by their motion will overwhelm the electromagnetic force, which is the force the keeps the electrons around the atom. Now when the electrons are no longer attached to the nucleus of the atom and moves around freely they will collide with protons since positive attracts negative charges. Then the electrons negative charge and the protons positive charge takes each other out and creates a neutral …

Neutron Stars Read More »

Pauli Exclusion Principal & Degeneracy Pressure

Paulis exclusion principal says that 2 fermions(matter particles) can’t be at the same place at the same time. When a particle from the fermion family gets cornered, like if you where to trap it in an ever shrinking box(the box is made up by Fermions so the particle and the particles making up the box can’t be at the same place at the same time), it would start to move fast and in an unpredictable fashion. This is because the wave length(which corresponds to the energy of the particle, the lower wave length the higher energy and higher energy corresponds …

Pauli Exclusion Principal & Degeneracy Pressure Read More »

Worm Holes & Quantum Mechanics

Worm holes are probably the most loved physical phenomena by sci if writers, because they simply are so extremely funky, they could offer time travel, travel into parallel universes, as well as just a short cut to places light years away in our own universe.Let’s talk about the short cuts; when travelling through a worm hole you get from one place to another in a shorter time then it would take you to travell, with the same speed as you travelled trough the wormhole, in ‘the normal way’. But when you travel through a worm hole you don’t really travel …

Worm Holes & Quantum Mechanics Read More »

Decoherence & Quantum Mechanics

This can be resolved with a process called decoherence. A large(macroscopical) object isn’t exactly like an atom. It is made up by some times millions of atoms. And it’s a averaging out of all these wave functions which creates the large object which we sees . Now, I said that the device and the cat were in a completely sealed container, but that was in parts a lie, it’s extremely hard to get a object completely isolated there will always be for example atoms in the air that collides with the object, or maybe a lamp in the container sending …

Decoherence & Quantum Mechanics Read More »

Smeared out Electron & Quantum Mechanics

In the top of this page where I discuss the problems and solutions, I said that electrons move in circular orbits around the nucleus. This statement isn’t entirely correct, see electron aren’t as depicted in some elementary text books, little balls flying around the nucleus and there’s a lot of empty space between them. In fact there aren’t any empty space at all around the nucleus, the electrons occupy it all. This is because the electrons wave function is “smeared” out around the nucleus and the electron has a chance of existing a bit everywere, which also has to do …

Smeared out Electron & Quantum Mechanics Read More »

The Delayed Choice Experiment In Quantum Mechanics

The delayed choice experiment wants to point our another strange thing about quantum mechanics, which is that in the experiment the particle seems to know what is going to happen. This experiment shows again that the quantum world does not act like our classical world. There are various different types of delayed choice experiments, but they all shows that the particle seems to have the ability to see into the future. Here I will take a fairly easy one.In the experiment you have a photon emitter and the a mirror which lets though half of the light shone on it …

The Delayed Choice Experiment In Quantum Mechanics Read More »

Quantum Tunneling 101

If you take a ball and throw it into the wall, it will of course bounce of the wall. But quantum mechanically a small piece of the balls wave function will “spill” a bit into the wall(the particles position is also uncertain and has a wave function), but it will not be able to pass through totally. This is because it ball has less energy then the wall. But as said above you can’t know an object properties too a 100%. This is also true for the energy level of balls, here it’s time and accuracy which is traded for …

Quantum Tunneling 101 Read More »

The EPR Paradox & Bell’s Theorem

You create two particles that have opposite spin (one have down the other one up) but you don’t measure them to see which is which yet. Then you send them off in different directions. Then some were down the line, one of them hits a spin filter then we know its spin; lets say it’s down. Then the other ones spin has to be up. This may not seem like a paradox. It’s just like if you have two boxes and one has a blue cube in it and the other one a red cube. If you open one of …

The EPR Paradox & Bell’s Theorem Read More »

The Wave Function In Quantum Mechanics

The wave function is a mathematical device for dealing with probabilities. Lets say we haven’t measured a particles spin(a particles spin has to do with the particles magnetic properties), its spin can be either up or down. Then we say that its wave function is 50% up and 50% down. You might say that it’s completely wrong to say that the particles spin is 50% up and 50% down, clearly the particle already has a determined spin just that we don’t know it yet. But this doesn’t apply to quantum mechanics, a particle doesn’t take on a special attribute until …

The Wave Function In Quantum Mechanics Read More »

The Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principal 101

The Heisenberg uncertainty principal is often in texts about Quantum Mechanics said to be that the more you know about a particles position the less you can know about its speed(although it’s actually momentum, which is speed times mass but for the sake of simplicity I’ll only use speed here). This isn’t completely true since the uncertainty principal can be applied to many other situations. But what it basically says is that, in the world of particles(on subatomic levels), if you want to know more about one thing, you’ll have to forfeit knowledge about another thing. But lets start with …

The Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principal 101 Read More »

Scroll to Top